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How To Get A Job In Venture Capital

I (Jason) get asked often how I got into venture capital and how interested folks may get involved as well.

I always tell them that I "fell" into the job, as most folks that I know who are VCs and that everyone has a different and unique story.

I then point them to my partner Seth’s blog post on the subject which I think is the best written authority on the subject.

Today, however, I received a paper that one of my students, Judd Rogers, wrote on the subject.  He takes Seth’s thoughts and puts a little bit of analytical muscle behind the subject.  It’s an interesting read for those wanting to know potential career paths toward VC.

April 14th, 2009 by     Categories: Venture Capital    
  • http://www.twitter.com/zeemer Azeem

    great article; pedigree in VC will not exist forever:

    “it (concentration of MBAs in VC) is a legacy of another time that will be wrung out of the system in the next decade i think” – Fred Wilson, from “One Thing You Don't Need To Be An Entrepreneur: A College Degree” ( ” target=”_blank”>http://www.avc.com)

  • http://ng.aztecassetmanagement.com/ Ying Ng

    A recent Q&A with a VC also had identical answers in “accidentally” becoming a VC, “spectacular” background, education, and so forth.

    http://ng.aztecassetmanagement.com/?p=66

  • Michael Stack

    As a colleague of mine (and former colleague of yours) says, “it's kinda like becoming a rock star–there are lots of routes to take and they're all really low probability.”

  • Jon Van V.

    “Chance favors the prepared mind.” or some variation is a quote attributed to Louis Pasteur. Perhaps that is the quote Judd Rodgers was alluding to? Anyway, I agree, though I am not a VC…yet. Well written paper, hope he got an A.

  • Andrew T-W

    A big fat wallop of luck was involved, but the controllables I had going for me:
    1. An IT undergrad, plus experience working in IT start-ups
    2. A professional accounting qualification (roughly CPA-equivalent I think), combined with a focus on supporting TMT clients of the accounting firm (spent a lot of study time thinking, “How would this be relevant to a TMT firm?”, whether it be tax, accounting, financial, etc)
    3. Aiming for CFA charter (had passed CFA II at the time I moved into the VC industry)

    I also read/self-studied incessantly about things that were potentially relevant to a TMT VC or start-up and spent a lot of time around founders.

    • http://www.jasonmendelson.com Jason Mendelson

      Yes, I think we all had a